Category Archives: Matthew

Gospel according to St. Mark

Mantegna’s Mark
image source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/eb/Andrea_Mantegna_087.jpg

Matthew’s gospel is well known for the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7) and the powerful prophetic portions of Matthew 24-25.

Luke’s gospel is beloved for its parables like the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) and the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32).

John’s gospel is a favorite of many for its “I AM” passages and poignant and pointed personal encounters.

That often leave Mark’s gospel out in the cold.

Yet, those who take the time to visit Mark and read through it find it has its own unique way to highlighting the vital message of Jesus.

For instance, take the rocket launch of the beginning of Mark in chapter 1:1-8 …

Mark 1:1-8 (NIV)

The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God, as it is written in Isaiah the prophet:

“I will send my messenger ahead of you,
who will prepare your way”—
“a voice of one calling in the wilderness,
‘Prepare the way for the Lord,
make straight paths for him.’”

And so John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to him. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River. John wore clothing made of camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. And this was his message: “After me comes the one more powerful than I, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. I baptize you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

N.T. Wright put it this way in Mark for Everyone (2004):

You are sound asleep and dreaming, when suddenly the door bursts open and a bright light shines full in your face. A voice, breaking in on your dream world shouts, “Wake up! Get up! You’ll be late!” And without more ado, the speaker splashes your face with cold water to make the point. Time to stop dreaming and face the most important day of your life.

Video

Implications of Christ’s Second Coming

In the final week of Jesus’ ministry on earth, he had many vigorous debates at the Temple. As Matthew 24 opened up, He and his disciples crossed the Kidron Valley and went up to the Mount of Olives. The Temple would have been strikingly visible to them as they looked westward from the Mount of Olives. It was there that Jesus predicted the utter destruction of the Temple to which the disciples undoubtedly felt very troubled by. They asked Jesus about it and Jesus addressed their questions. Matthew summarized the teaching on the Mount of Olives in Matthew 24-25. This video touches on some of the highlights of this teaching that is still timely today.